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Sarasota, Florida 34239
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Tuesday, 09 September 2014 15:40

Facelifts for men vs. facelifts for women

One of the facts of life that surprises a lot of my patients (although they invariably say something like, “Oh yeah, that’s right!” when I bring it to their attention) is just another of Mother Nature’s little ironies:

faceliftsAs women age, they tend to become more masculine looking in the face. Features harden and sharpen, and the soft curves of the face of their youth morph into angles.

As men age, they tend to become more feminine looking in the face. The chiseled jaw softens, sometimes into oblivion, and the strong virile features that defined their masculinity in youth seem to melt and sadden.

That is one of the reasons why facelifts, lid surgeries and even BoTox and fillers can go so awry. It’s why women can look “harder” after they’ve had work done and why men can look sort of “weird”. Those of us who treat faces need to understand that you don’t just follow your Doctor Book and approach people like a technician. It is our responsibility to understand the subtle differences that give femininity or masculinity to the face and to be able to translate that into the work we do with our patients.

The aim is to restore softness, sweetness, perhaps even a bit of an angelic look to the woman’s face. On the other hand, the aim with a man is to restore a look of strength and virility to his face. This requires an almost 180 degree turn in our approach to the two genders. And this is one of the ways we make our “work” look natural.

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dr barbour

Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon,
Sarasota, Florida

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